Dating of Long Bone Fracture Healing among Egyptian Pediatrics by Radiography (X-Ray)

Authors

  • Amal Salama Mahmoud1 , Amany Mohamed Fahmy1 , Alaa Mohamed Mahmoud1, Amani Abdelfattah Bayomi1 , Ahmed Yosri El- Amir2

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i3.10511

Keywords:

dating, long bone, fracture healing, X- ray.

Abstract

Background: Estimating the timing of skeletal injury accurately is of great importance in forensic cases

and has a significant bearing on the judicial process (related to abused children). This work aimed to assess

dating of long bone healing in fractures occurring to children aged from 1 to 18 years through using plain

radiography (X-Ray) which can determine 6 features of fracture healing process that are especially important

in alleged cases of child abuse. The most commonly affected ages were “1-6” years presenting 68%. Males

were the majority of cases (56%). The illustrated data of each feature of healing (6 features of fracture

healing) form a prototype timetable of fracture healing. These data suggest that fractures with soft-tissue

swelling alone are acute fracture (< 1 week old). Fractures with periosteal reaction alone are likely to be

recent fracture (between 8 days and 3 weeks old). Once Remodelling, bridging & hard callus fractures

detected then old fracture is expected (more than 6 weeks old).

Author Biography

Amal Salama Mahmoud1 , Amany Mohamed Fahmy1 , Alaa Mohamed Mahmoud1, Amani Abdelfattah Bayomi1 , Ahmed Yosri El- Amir2

1 Department of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. 2

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Kasr Alainy Street, Cairo 11562,

Egypt.

Published

2020-07-30

How to Cite

Amal Salama Mahmoud1 , Amany Mohamed Fahmy1 , Alaa Mohamed Mahmoud1, Amani Abdelfattah Bayomi1 , Ahmed Yosri El- Amir2. (2020). Dating of Long Bone Fracture Healing among Egyptian Pediatrics by Radiography (X-Ray). Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, 14(3), 1048-1052. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i3.10511