Hydration Status and Degree of Clinical Severity Patients with THRoMBotic Infarction Stroke

Authors

  • Agung Nugroho1, Hendro Susilo1

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i2.3375

Keywords:

Stroke, dehydration status, BUN/SK, NIHSS

Abstract

Background: Dehydration is common in acute ischemic stroke patients and associated with a poor increase in clinical outcomes. It is caused of the increase of hematocrit related to the infarct volume which is wider to the cerebra infarct patients. It is also related to the repeatedly emboli stroke and thromboembolic vena after the occurrence of the acute stroke. Objectives: To analyze the correlation between hydration status and clinical severity in patients with acute thrombotic stroke. Methods: This study was conducted by using control design consecutive admission sampling technique. Serum BUN and creatinine measurements were performed when patients were administered to the hospital. Dehydration was defined if the ratio of BUN/serum creatinine was >15. Patients were divided into dehydration and non-dehydrated groups. The degree of clinical severity was measured by using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at 7 days of onset of stroke. Data were analyzed using chi square, fisher, t dependent test, and mann whitney (p <0.05). Result: There were 19.23% stroke patients with dehydration were in the case group and the control group were 9.62%. There was no significant correlation between hydration status and clinical severity in acute thrombotic stroke patients (p = 0.126; OR = 2.625). Conclusion: There was no correlation between hydration status and clinical severity in acute thrombotic stroke.

Author Biography

Agung Nugroho1, Hendro Susilo1

1Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Dr. Soetomo Teaching Hospital, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya 60285, Indonesia

Published

2020-04-29

How to Cite

Agung Nugroho1, Hendro Susilo1. (2020). Hydration Status and Degree of Clinical Severity Patients with THRoMBotic Infarction Stroke. Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, 14(2), 2325-2330. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i2.3375