Effect of Environment Factors on Life Cycle of Forensic Entomology: A Review

Authors

  • Nassreen N. Mzhr 1 : Zaid Raad Abbas2 , Zaid Naji Hassan3

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i4.11941

Keywords:

judicial entomology, periods since decease, decease investigation, blowfly, decomposition, PMI, periods since decease

Abstract

Pests play an important ecological part in organic matter decomposition. As a natural means of survival,
sarcosaprophagous fly usually prefers to locate and consume a food source such as a cadaver as a natural
means of survival. Sarcosaprohagous fly larvae are frequently encountered by judicial entomologists
during post mortem investigations. The most relevant colonizers are the oldest individuals derived from
the first eggs placed on the body. The stage of the oldest maggots provides the accurate estimate of post
mortem interval. Judicial entomology is predictable in numerous countries as a serious tool for forensic
investigations. Judicial entomology requires extensive information on the local pest population, is subject
to many environmental factors (temperature being one of the principle variables), and they need access to
the bodies. The maggot fly crawling on the dead bodies are broadly considered to be just another disgusting
element of decay and are not collected at the periods of autopsy. This paper reviews several methods of PMI
assessment, this procedure comprises the aggregation of convenient information for the growth of the types
of pest at a variation of pertinent temperatures and contemplation of the extra living things and nonliving
things aspects that can disturb evolving average.

Author Biography

  • Nassreen N. Mzhr 1 : Zaid Raad Abbas2 , Zaid Naji Hassan3

    1
    Lecturer, 2Assistant Professor, Lecturer, Biology Department, College of Science-Mustansiriyah University, Iraq

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Published

2020-10-29

How to Cite

Effect of Environment Factors on Life Cycle of Forensic Entomology: A Review. (2020). Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, 14(4), 2363-2368. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v14i4.11941