Porotic Hyperostosis and Cribra Orbitalia as Indicators of Nutritional Problems in Ancient Population

Authors

  • Rachmadita Yoga Pratiwi

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v15i4.17034

Keywords:

porotic hyperostosis, cribra orbitalia, iron deficiency anemia

Abstract

Background One of the most studied pathological conditions in human bone remains is porotic hyperostosis
and cribra orbitalia, where the condition of porosity or bone tissue is porous and looks like a coral, sieve
or sponge-like formation, and is often associated with a history of anemia. nutritional deficiencies, certain
diseases and so on. This is often seen in the skull because the bone tries to increase the marrow space available
for increased red blood cell formation. Porotic hyperostosis and cribra orbitalia (some paleopathologists put
into the same category as porotic hyperostosis) occur due to conditions caused by the body’s attempts to
produce more red blood cells in the marrow to compensate for iron deficiency. The longer this iron deficiency
continues, the more clearly these lesions will form. Objective This study was conducted to see the picture
of the lesion porotic hyperostosis and criba orbitalia associated with anemia and nutritional deficiencies.
Methods This study is a case study by observing an intact skull without a mandible, by inspecting the
regions of the skull and the roof of the orbit. Results Found coral, sieve or spongy formations on the roof
of the skull and the roof of the orbit. The presence of a skull lesion can be an indicator of the fragility of an
individual’s bones. Conclusion Anemia and deficiency conditions can result in the formation of lesions in
the skull.

Author Biography

Rachmadita Yoga Pratiwi

Postgraduate Student of Master Program in Forensic Science, Universitas Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia

Published

2021-08-16

How to Cite

Rachmadita Yoga Pratiwi. (2021). Porotic Hyperostosis and Cribra Orbitalia as Indicators of Nutritional Problems in Ancient Population. Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, 15(4), 2205-2212. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v15i4.17034