A Study on the Characteristic Features of Covid-19 Deaths in a Regional Hospital in Mthatha in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Authors

  • Kaswa RP
  • B Meel

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v16i1.17723

Keywords:

Covid-19, diabetes, hypertension, HIV, oxygen

Abstract

Background: Covid-19 is an acute health emergency to human beings all over the world. This pandemic
has destabilised the day-to-day life of almost everyone. It is a challenge to scientists and politicians to
initiate a return to normal human life from the grip of Covid-19 so that the economies of countries do
not stop growing.
Objective: To study the characteristics of Covid-19 deaths in a regional hospital in Mthatha in the
Eastern Cape, South Africa.
Method: It is a retrospective record review study of the cases of patients in Mthatha Regional Hospital
(MRH) in South Africa who were not able to be saved.
Results: There were 100 deaths in MRH. Of these 57 (57%) were females and 43 (43%) males. The
average age was 63.3 years. Shortness of breath was the most common presenting symptom followed
by weakness, a cough and fever. More than half of the Covid-19 cases had associated co-morbidity such
as hypertension (50%), diabetes (37%) and HIV (15%). The mean oxygen saturation (SpO2) at the time
of admission was 75.5±17 on pulse oximetry.
Conclusion: The covid-19 mortality was 1.3 times higher among females in the regional hospital under
study. The majority of the victims were suffering hypertension and diabetes.

Author Biographies

Kaswa RP

MBBS, M. Med Family Medicine, Consultant, Regional Hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape, South Africa

B Meel

Professor MBBS, MD, DOH (Wits), DHSM (Natal), MPhil HIV/AIDS Management (Stellenbosch), Research
Associate, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth 6017 South Africa

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Published

2021-11-29

How to Cite

Kaswa RP, & B Meel. (2021). A Study on the Characteristic Features of Covid-19 Deaths in a Regional Hospital in Mthatha in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, 16(1), 1554–1559. https://doi.org/10.37506/ijfmt.v16i1.17723